PUBLICATIONS

Dynamic impacts of commodity flow disruptions in inland waterway networks

Pant, R., Barker, K., and Landers, T.L.

Freight and passenger transport in the US is projected to increase substantially by 2035 making a strong case for greater usage of the inland waterway barge transport. Inland waterway networks constitute an important component of the US multi-modal transport infrastructure spanning 25,000 miles of navigable routes across 38 states. Risk-based preparedness planning for inland waterway networks requires a means to assess the interdependent impacts associated with closures to inland waterway infrastructure. This study proposes a dynamic framework to assess multi-regional, multi-industry losses due to disruptions on the waterway networks, including ports and waterway links. We investigate simulation-driven disruptive scenarios, such as dock closures, that affect daily commerce across the waterway network and integrate with a dynamic interdependency model to quantify the effect of disruptions on industry inoperability across multiple regions and multiple industries. We implement our framework with a data-driven case study of the operations at the Port of Catoosa on the McClellan–Kerr Arkansas River branch of the Mississippi River Navigation System. Resulting dock-specific, industry-specific, and region-specific insights can guide preparedness decision making.

Dynamic impacts of commodity flow disruptions in inland waterway networks. 2014. Computers & Industrial Engineering. DOI: 10.1016/j.cie.2014.11.016.

RESEARCH THEMES

ENERGY
TRANSPORT
WATER
DIGITAL COMMUNICATIONS
DEMOGRAPHICS
URBAN
DEVELOPMENT
ECONOMICS
INFRASTRUCTURE
GOVERNANCE
NISMOD
RISK AND
RESILIENCE
RESEARCH SOFTWARE ENGINEERING
DATABASES